expressions gallery
510.644.4930
2035 Ashby Ave. Berkeley, California, 94703

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Expressions Gallery Arts and Educational Center

Expressions Gallery Arts and Educational Center is a 501 (C) (3) non profit corporation. We offer workshops, seminars and classes to artists, kids and adults. For more information go to our website at: www.expressionsartsandedcenter.com or contact our Educational Coordinator: Marge Essel at 510-548-2617 You can also call the gallery at 510-644-4930 and leave a message.

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Current Show | Show Archives

Artist Biographies -
Creativity Unhoused
March 9- May 24, 2019

Artists

Click on Thumbnails to Enlarge Artwork

Lahcen Abalil

Lahcen Abalil lives in Berkeley, Ca. He grew up in Morocco and moved to the United States in 2007. He began doing art in 2010. He is self-taught. While living at the Senior Center, his friends told him he had created unique pieces of art. He creates his artworks with wool, cotton, wood, sheets of glitter, sand, sandpaper and ink and colored paper cut and pasted to create an image. All his ideas are inspired from his imagination. He sees a bird or an animal and transforms it through his imagination into a unique composition. Recently, he has started taking classes at the Senior Center and has been in an exhibition there.

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Miriam Abramowitsch

Miriam Abramowitsch was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area, the daughter of a concert pianist. Following in her father's footsteps, she devoted her life to music and has experienced a long and fulfilling career as a singer and teacher of voice.  She has also had a lifelong love for color, style and texture (as a child she wanted to be a clothing designer).  Three years ago, having never before attempted any visual art medium, she became interested in felting and took a number of classes at Deep Color in Kensington.  Since then she never looked back and has been creating and selling her colorful felted scarves throughout the Bay Area and beyond.  The artist states: Felt is created by the alchemy of wool fiber with warm water and pure olive oil soap to produce a versatile material that ranges from spider-fine and soft to thick and strong, depending on its intended purpose.  I design my scarves in a number of different ways.  I mostly use a blend of wool and tinsel fiber, which produces a soft crinkled, shimmery effect. Right now I especially enjoy creating playful latticework scarves in a riot of different color combinations, and felting a variety of shapes and colors onto lengths of chiffon or hand dyed habotai silk.

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Judith Allen

Judith Allen is a Berkeley-based corporate-communications professional, fine artist and writer. Her undergraduate and graduate exposure to literature, philosophy, and mass communication, as well as her immersion in social justice organizations, are deeply reflected in her art. Coming into her fine-art career in mid-life, Judith “came out of the box,” showing and selling her work successfully on both coasts. She uses digital drawing and painting, high-format scanning and photography “sweetened” with handmade paper and textiles (previously designed by her) to create lustrous and evocative limited-edition archival ultra-chrome prints on paper and canvas. Influenced by formalists Edward Weston and Georgia O’Keefe, as well as 17th century still-life masters. Because I am also influenced by several twentieth century surrealists as well as the developing conventions of digital time and space, these images admittedly have a definite “edge” and depth that go beyond what first appears—stemming also from her personal visual iconography in a world where Nature, Humane Values and Continuity are so much at risk. She notes that the themes of decadence, fragility, and the fine gradations between life/death and natural/artificial in our post-modern world haunt her daily. Her constantly evolving body of work on Homelessness began in 2016 when she realized that she for days she had been passing an old woman sitting propped up by a downtown Berkeley building, going unnoticed by most all who passed. The woman, though getting probably nearing death, day by day, did not ask for money. She would take it only when Allen offered her payment to take her portrait. The result was the basis for a multi-layered work, “On the Street-1,” that has been exhibited locally as well as purchased for permanent display at the western regional office of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In 2017, Allen based another multimedia-collaged work called “Pink Wanderer,” on a local, possibly schizophrenic, woman who wore only pink and walked the downtown area countless times daily with her pink suitcases. All of Judith Allen’s work is done in meticulous “limited edition” and is available for sale, as well as frequently shown in galleries throughout California. She continues to focus her artistic mind on how to make the homeless condition in this country more visible.

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ANONYMOUS A

"Each member of the trio is roughly 15'' tall on a base about 8"X8".  Disassembled, they nest comfortably together in a 5 gallon plastic bucket; each tinkerock is numbered for easy re-assembly and each can be moodily postured from upright to leaning.  Total weight is 42 pounds. The true backstory is that the three are currently desperate undocumented refugees unable to raise transportation fare to Paris. The deeper backstory is more tragic: Each stone has spent eons being rolled and rounded by flowing river currents -- meanwhile having its corners and protrusions battered away by collisions while being polished by silts rough and fine till it achieves distinct individual identity. Having thus evolved, they are then callously ripped from their natural surroundings and violently penetrated by a human with a hammer drill.  Some survive in damaged state, only to be plugged with steel dowels for capture into silly arrangements, but others equally fine in heritage are actually demolished by the same criminal civilizing intervention. I've presented the three your offer.  They've conferred and would happily participate together, but suggest that one could as well represent them as three while conserving space -- and that the one whose head is that of a deposed ruler, since decapitated, might be most appropriate."

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Adrianne Bank

Adrianne Bank is currently a 20 year lover of life in Berkeley. She grew up in Manhattan and received her B.A. from Oberlin College. Before landing in Berkeley, she resided in Cambridge, Athens (Greece), Washington, DC and – for 35 years – In Los Angeles. She has been involved in education at all levels and earned her Ph.D from UCLA. Landscapes and seascapes have always been an important part of what she likes to see and absorb. She has put these soul-satisfying scenes on paper during visits to Ireland, Italy, France, Denmark, Norway and Guatemala. Here at home, however, she has been haunted by images of homelessness and destruction. She now sometimes makes paintings of these in the middle of the night. For the past few years, she has been learning more of the complex secrets of watercolor guided by her skillful teacher, Julia Montrond. She is a happy student, becoming better able to show what she sees and feels. She has also been viewing with newfound appreciation the works of John Singer Sargent, Frederick Turner, Winslow Homer, Georgia O’Keefe and contemporary artists, and is pleased to understand better how they, too, show what they see and feel.

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Susan Black

Susan Black has been a housing advocate for the last forty plus years. She has a special interest in low income housing and the unsheltered. Dorothy Day House was in her neighborhood for nearly a year. Susan volunteered and was awed by the experience. Everyone was treated with respect and kindness. Staff came from the homeless or recently homeless population. She joined the board of directors to try and help grow and support the organization. She still volunteers at the shelter that is now downtown. Photography came to Susan late in life. She finally found a mentor/teacher who lit her fire. She is now consumed and obsessed but short on technical skills. She does very little editing on her work. She wants her pictures to be real and she wants others to be able to see what she sees. Susan has been described as a neighborhood photographer who captures emotion. She looks for both tragedy and beauty in every day moments of her life. In her “street” photography I try and bring the unseen into the eye of the unseeing. She does this with beauty.

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Sarita Blum

Sarita Blum was born in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and has lived in Berkeley since 2008. She holds a BA in Communication and Advertising, and is currently dedicated to Digital Art. Her work reflects her remarkable ability to develop unique images, from multiple elements and using a variety of resources and media. She creates a vibrant and touching art based on her perception of commonly unnoticed details. Sarita enthusiastically describes herself as an experimental artist, constantly looking for new sources of inspiration and techniques to express them.

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Yvonne Brady

Yvonne Brady currently lives in Vallejo, CA. She is a California native who was raised in Oakland. Her parents were from New Orleans, Louisiana. She attended college in New Orleans and San Francisco. She has worked as an accountant at Peralta Community College System and the University of California Office of the pressions Gallery.She is the mother of one son. Yvonne was always interested in jewelry and she took a class at Bead Inspiration in Alameda, CA to learn how to string beads in order to repair a turquoise and sterling silver necklace. She also took a class at Studio One in Oakland, Ca to learn to make glass beads. Yvonne mostly works with gemstones using sterling silver, brass, copper, and pewter. She is greatly inspired by African and African American Art which is part of her heritage and you will see this influence in some of her work. She uses African beads from Ghana and Nigeria, and pendants from the Tuarag in the Sahara, Ethiopian Coptic Christian Crosses as well as stones from other parts of the world. The Artist gives credit for her creative spirit to her mother who taught her how to sew at an early age and continued to encourage her throughout her life. Her endeavors are also fully supported by her son who promotes her work.

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Barbara Brust

Barbara Brust, Founder of Consider the Homeless, is an ACTIVIST that uses any and all mediums to get a message across. In her work on the streets with the un-housed she is both in and out of the trenches. There is much to be learned in this fashion and she is a quick study. The biggest obstacle Barbara has found in her struggles has been the “attitude” of so many of those comfortably “housed.” She has made it part of her life to work with this callousness and do what she can to touch some place in their hearts, a space that can begin to create change. Far too little EMPATHY is exhibited, nor is it even given a thought, when dictating policies by those in power. Far too few see people on the streets as having any worth… more love is shown to our 4-legged friends than these people, these human beings, who are our neighbors! Mostly they are to be ignored and blamed for just about anything. Barbara’s videos and photos try to change this. She offers a safe space to see their eyes without them noticing you… to read and see their stories without having to interact with them… she can only hope that in some ways, this can open their heart to the souls they ignore.

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Aaron Carter

Aaron Carter lives in the East Bay.  He works in various mediums: ceramics, drawing, sculpture, design, and painting. He went to Castlemont High where his drawing teacher put one of his works in an exhibit at the Oakland Museum. This spurred his interest in learning more about different forms of art and he took classes at Laney College (drawing, design, silkscreen, advertising art, and art history); at  San Francisco State (advanced drawing, metal arts, film, advanced ceramics, and Raku); and, at Merritt College (advanced ceramics).  He continues his studies and is very close to a degree in art.  He was hired as part of the college staff, firing for one class and helping students as a mentor.  With a Raku kiln given to him by a teacher and a small kiln that he purchased, the artist started doing his work from home, selling his ceramics on Telegraph Avenue, at street fairs, and in art galleries. As a member of the Richmond Art Center since 2003, he had one of his pieces displayed with the featured artist during his first year of membership.  In 2006, he became one of the featured artists and won the Jan Hart-Schuyers Artistic Achievement Award. Currently, he is a member of Pro Arts and is now also showing his work at Expressions Gallery.

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Louis Cuneo

Louis Cuneo, a Berkeley resident is a photographer and poet who began his literary career as a poet and writer in Greenwich Village in the late 1950s and moved to the San Francisco Bay Area in 1970. He is the author of fourteen books, a Haiku expert, editor & publisher, professional photographer, director & founder of Mother’s Hen, and founder & coordinator of the Berkeley Poetry Festiva. His artistic work as a photographer uses the Japanese tradition of Haiga, the visual form of Haiku. He captures a moment, the intersection of time and space and uses the “absence of influence” to maintains the essential nature of what he photographs. These original prints of the former Bay Area homeless community are printed with archival inks on archival watercolor paper.

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Carol Denney

Carol Denney is a self-taught artist, writer, and musician born in East Los Angeles. Her work is influenced by the stories of blacklisting and discrimination from her musical family's acquaintance with jazz musicians in her early years. She is the founder and editor of the twenty-six year old Pepper Spray Times, the human rights editor of Street Spirit newspaper, a contributor to the Berkeley Daily Planet, a musician who works with the Augusta Music Heritage Center in West Virginia, a member of the Revolutionary Poets Brigade, and a cartoonist for the Berkeley Times. She works in pen, ink, acrylics, and watercolor.

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Doc

Doc. For many years, my regular pre-dawn walk took me down Solano Avenue to San Pablo. One morning I noticed a man who appeared confused. He stood on the corner opposite the bus stop, but when the light changed, he didn’t go anywhere. When he was there again a few days later, I crossed the street to ask if he was OK. Under the streetlamp I could see he was wearing several layers of soiled clothing. He didn’t exactly step back when I said, “hi,” but he paused before responding. I extended my hand and introduced myself. He paused again, extended his, and said, “I’m Doc.” I thought he said “duck,” but he corrected me. I said I, too, was a doc, though not the kind that can heal people. Over the months, we chatted when our paths crossed. I couldn’t always follow the train of his reasoning, but I didn’t press for clarity. He would disappear for weeks or months, then turn up again, having changed “home” base. I occasionally offered material support; he accepted with dignity. He occasionally made requests, such as when his shoes could no longer be held together with tape. His artistry was evident though also hidden. He worked with raw materials—aluminum cans, plastic bottles, bottle caps, wires, rubber bands—and hand tools he stored behind a wall or in a bush. Once I was alerted to it, I noticed his bird and flower sculptures on many trees, fences, and light poles around Solano Avenue. Out of the blue, the Albany Police called me. Doc had amassed a cache of larger sculptures and works-in-progress, and neighbors had complained. When the police came to move him and trash his stuff, he handed them my card (why or when I had given it to him, I no longer remembered). Doc asked me to take his work. I said I would store it for him. He said, no, he didn’t want them anymore. I arranged delivery. A4-foot high, 200-poundwooden crate was unloaded in my driveway. As my husband and I unpacked the box filled with sculptures wrapped in newspaper, I was stunned by his creativity and power. I wanted his work to be seen. Even more, I wanted him to know that his work was appreciated by others. That was more than 7 years ago, and this is the opportunity I have been looking for. - Kathleen Taylor, Ph.D., Professor.

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Anna Hui Dong

Anna Hui Dong lives among noisy undergrads near UC Berkeley. Born in Jinan, China, she has since lived in Mississippi, New York, Alaska, and Guatemala. As a child, she was fascinated by brilliant colors and intricate shapes. Her great-grandmother, a poor, illiterate widow who raised her, taught her embroidery and paper folding. An improvisational storyteller, Great-grandma also attached a vivid narrative to every character made of thread or paper. Nowadays, while working as a dentist for community clinics, Anna continues to pursue her artistic interests: drawing, craft, writing, and dancing. She sees continuity in everything she does: Her travels and artworks often inspire her writing, and she has won intercultural-essay and fiction awards; the interest in Spanish literature and Latin dance brought her to Latin America, where she discovered the unique color combinations in indigenous clothing and crafts. These earrings, though made of Japanese origami paper, are largely inspired by the color schemes of the modern Mayan women's dresses.

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Marge Essel

Marge Essel lives in Berkeley, California. She was born in Western Pennsylvania. She became interested in fine arts at the age of 6. She took up painting & attending her 1st classes. While attending high school, she began her formal art training by studying figure drawing in preparation for an Art degree. Following graduation she took a position as a designer & artist for the Lovelace Marionette Theater. She returned to Berkeley to further her studies & became the head costume designer for a dance company. She returned to college in 1980 to attend UCB to receive a Fine Arts credential. Marge continued her studies & in 1982 received a B.A. from New College.. She studied ceramics at CAL State. She exhibited shows there. She received a Fine Art & Multiple Subjects credential. She has been an artist in residence with the Berkeley Arts Center & the Oakland Museum. She has studied art in London, England & Hawaii. She has exhibited ceramic sculptures, paintings & photographs in group shows in Berkeley, Oakland & Alameda. She has received several artists’ grants from the Academy of Art in S.F. where she studied photography & photographic processes. These along with her sculptures & paintings were exhibited in 2 one woman shows.

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Debbie Fimrite

Debbie Fimrite is a deaf, Japanese-inspired artist with over 30 years of experience studying, creating, exhibiting, and occasionally teaching art. She enjoys painting, drawing, sculpture, computer graphics, photography, origami, creating art dolls, and altering Barbies. Always interested in art as a means of inspiration, self-expression and healing; she was fortunate to grow up in the presence of many supportive artists, including her mother, who is a painter and sculptor. Over the years she has exhibited in a number of Bay Area galleries, including the Fort Mason Art Center, the Nanny Goat Hill Gallery, Gallery Sanchez, The Tea Spot Cafe,  the Japan Center, Red Ink Studios, the Market Street Gallery,  Art 94124 Gallery, Age Song Gallery, and participated in San Francisco and East Bay Open Studios.

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Rinna B. Flohr

Rinna B. Flohr lives in Oakland, California. She grew up on the East Coast in New Jersey and New York. She graduated from Syracuse University with a B. A. in theatre arts and a Masters of Social Work. She also completed a Certificate in Psychodrama at the Moreno Institute of Psychodrama in New York. She received her license as a clinical social worker and for 37 years she worked as a licensed psychotherapist in private practice and as Deputy Director of Mental Health for Alameda County; Director of the Center for Special Problems, San Francisco Community Mental Health and Assistant Director for San Francisco County Behavioral Health Services. In 1991 her house burned down in the Oakland fire, which led her to study Interior Architecture and Design in order to rebuild her home. She completed the program at UC Berkeley in 2001. With an interior design degree she started Design Ideas and she began doing remodels and designing new interiors that later led her to staging and floral design. She studied floral design with Ron Morgan. Her floral designs were part of the Bouquets to Art Show at the Legion of Honor Museum in San Francisco in the past and she was a member of the San Francisco Museum flower committee. She also makes jewelry from recycled materials left over from interior design projects and later from other found objects such as found rubber from inner tubes of tires or cement from building sites. She was President of San Francisco Women Artists in San Francisco, one of the oldest women’s art galleries. Currently she is founder and Director of Expressions Gallery in Berkeley, Ca.

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Sue Mary Fox

Sue Mary Fox splits her year between her winter workroom in Berkeley, CA, and her summer workroom in the village of Robinson, Maine.  Born and raised in a rural hamlet on the wild Maine coast, Fox spent her early summers organizing bits and pieces of nature’s “art parts” into patterns on 2- and 3-dimensional surfaces.  Much of her outdoor time was spent along beaches assembling installations of flotsam and jetsam that would become rearranged by time, tide, and weather.  Participating in the long-term process of building and observing the progress of disintegrating beach installations has been a lifelong interest. Although she trained in ceramics at university, Fox spent 32 years in the field of design and construction using the sewing machine – at various times employed making Art to Wear clothing; costumes for theater, dance, opera, and circus, and more recently, in creating site specific installations for commercial interiors.  A full time studio artist since 2001, Fox maintains a fully equipped sewing studio on each coast where she primarily produces boldly colorful quilts with an abstract contemporary edge. Her large format quilts have been exhibited across the United States and in Europe. Scarf making offers the joyful opportunity to play with color and texture.

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Talia Frank

Talia Frank lives in Berkeley and was born in San Francisco, California. Throughout childhood and adolescence, Talia pursued drawing and painting; initially, she was drawn to depicting animals and now, plants and earth tones remain a constant. In 2015, she received her Bachelors of Fine Arts in Printmaking from California College of the Arts. Talia has shown in several group exhibitions including "Variations and Diversions" at Live Worms Gallery. Her part in "Diversions", an interactive installation honoring the memory of a departed community member, marked a change from the 2D picture plane to which she's applied the majority of her work. Recently, Talia completed a six-week artist residency, held in Berlin, Germany with the organization Centre for the Study of Substructured Loss. During this time, she utilized folded paper in symbolic empathy, and grew to love community gardens.

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Suzi Garner

Suzi Garner is an artist who lives and works in Berkeley. She has collaborated on several projects with other artists in Berkeley and Oakland, both housed and unhoused, including members of First They Came for the Homeless and The Village/Feed the People in Oakland, and Berkeley Food and Housing Project.

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Ryan Harrison

Ryan Harrison graduated from the San Francisco Art Institute in 2017 with a BFA in Printmaking. He received the Outstanding Printmaking Student Award, as well as the Bronze Roller Award. Ryan Harrison has assisted at New Grounds Print Workshop, Mullowney Printing, and the Tamarind Institute. He runs Shaky Hands Press, a small printmaking studio in Oakland. Ryan Harrison is currently working for Oakland based artist Sandy Walker as his printer and assistant, as well working as a printer with Anne Kirk Textiles.

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Art Hazelwood

Art Hazelwood, printmaker, painter, muralist, impresario, educator, independent curator, and political activist, was born in Concord, Massachusetts on May 22, 1961. He studied at the University of California at Santa Cruz and received his B.A. degree in Fine Arts in 1983. After graduation, Hazelwood travelled extensively in Asia, and lived in Vienna and then the American Southwest before settling in San Francisco, California in 1993. He is a member of and exhibited with the California Society of Printmakers and the Print Club of Albany. His work has been in numerous exhibitions since his first exhibition in Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1989. He curated or co-curated the following exhibitions: Three Worlds: Myths Bricks Prints Arias Fuentes Banjo, Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts, San Francisco (2009); California in Relief: A History in Wood and Linocut, Hearst Art Gallery (2009);  Hobos to Street People: Artists’ Responses to Homelessness from the New Deal to the Present, travelling exhibition (2009-2012). In 2008, Hazelwood teamed with Stephen Fredericks of the New York Society of Etchers to organize Art of Democracy, a national coalition of fifty exhibitions across the country that lead up to the presidential elections. That same year Hazelwood worked with Anne Brodzky and DeWitt Cheng to curate the Art of Democracy War and Empire. Hazelwood is a champion of political causes and fellow artists. Hazelwood’s work is in the collections of the Library of Congress, Whitney Museum of American Art, Ball State University Art Museum, Yale University Library, Stanford Library Special Collections, New York Public Library, Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts, Fresno Museum of Art, Saint Mary’s College Museum of Art in Moraga, Lillie M. Kleven Print Collection at the Bemidji State University, the University of Indiana at Bloomington, and the Center for the Study of Political Graphics in Los Angeles. His works were donated to First They Came For The Homeless’ show Creativity Unhoused by WRAP (Western Regional Advocacy Project).

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Stan Huncilman

Stan Huncilman was born in Indiana, but he is a product of the San Francisco Bay Area art world.  He attended San Francisco State University, where he was introduced to Funk Art and Happenings in the 1970s.  He received his M.F.A. from the San Francisco Art Institute in 1984.  S.F.A.I. is the home of the Bay Area’s leading art instructors. He has been a sculptor for more than 25 years.  Stan works in a variety of materials.  As a matter of practice he uses the material that is most expedient to creating the sculpture he wants rather than “pushing a particular material.”  His sculptures often begin from a simple sketch.  He prefers to work in a direct manner rather than making molds of models before the final sculpture. The artist states: “I combine a child-like playfulness with primitivism. This creates a wonderland of intriguing forms and convoluted messages.  When I enter my studio there is a mental sign post reading ‘Linear Thinking Stops Here’. Through my sculpture I create a world of nutritiously puzzling paradigms whose roots may be in religion, folk art, nineteenth-century industrialisms or Greek mythology.  In this world, a whimsical sense of humor walks arm in arm with an obstinate determination to create.”  The sculptures in this exhibition are part of his “All My Psyches” series, a whimsical, yet intriguing observation of the complexities of consciousness.  His solo exhibits include Holy Names College in Oakland, California and the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California.

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Diane Jacobson

Diane Jacobson lives in Oakland, CA. She is a transplant from the Little League capital of the world, Williamsport, Pennsylvania. As a veteran teacher in the Oakland schools, she used many art projects and visual cues to instruct her English learners. Although she dabbled in art classes an undergraduate, her interest in glass art was not kindled until the 1990's.  Through classes at Studio One and the Crucible, she has expanded her areas of expertise to include kiln casting and working deep, as well as fusing and slumping glass.  Her pieces are represented in Pro Arts Open Studio as well as several galleries in the Bay Area.  Artist states: "What I like best about fused glass is its element of surprise.  Glass is a chameleon.  Observe the pieces as the light changes.  Glass is a fickle and somewhat undependable medium, as reactions to color and temperature cause a visual dance of light and texture.  Enjoy the dance."

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Ann Jasperson

Ann Jasperson lives and works in Stamford, CT but grew up north of Chicago the youngest of a large family. The fire that is art was started when a family friend gave her a “Paint by Numbers” set-then it was off to the races. Nurtured by her sister Joan and many wonderful teachers she attended the Cleveland Institute of Art and graduated in 1981 with a BFA in Drawing/illustration. Moving to New York soon after graduation, she “fell” into the toy business, then became a toy inventor which is her “day job”. But always in the background was a love of stones. Designing and creating jewelry has become a word of mouth business that has grown over the last five years. One of a kind pieces inspired by the natural beauty of stones and pearls done just Once makes for wearable art. Other interests include her internet cartoon Cranky Bears, her garden, dogs and husband G.C. Stone.

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Minal Jeswani

Minal Jeswan lives in the Bay Area. She received a BFA in pictorial art, San Jose State University, December 2009. She has exhibited her work in numerous places. My work is about chaos and order, about struggling to find balance in the ever- changing world around me, about keeping steady amidst the turbulence of a constantly altering world. Over the last three years my art made the switch from representational to non-objective. Art is a medium that allows me to be in the present moment and helps me connect with my subconscious. I’m interested more in the unseen than the seen world. I am primarily interested in the essence, the life force that connects us all, the underlying life source that inhabits every plant, animal, and human. My art is connected with my everyday world, whether perceived or conceived. My relationship with my work is a quest for getting to know myself; art is a gateway to my inner world.

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Richard Kane

Richard Kane has lived in the Bay Area since 1975, first San Francisco, then Oakland since 1990. He grew up in Minneapolis Minnesota. He has been doing various art forms since the crayons and finger paint of kindergarten, including drawing, airbrush/spray-paint, poetry, and cooking; with a current passion for masks of man-made materials and Poetry. He participated in art workshops with the Walker art center in Minneapolis in High School, attended the Academy of Art in San Francisco and Lane College in Oakland. He has a certificate in Culinary Arts from S.F. City College. He made and sold locally noted cards done with airbrush and paint using found objects as templates in the 1980’s. Artist states: With this art form I consider myself part of an ancient tradition of mask making using the materials at hand, I just happen to have very different material at hand.I see the face of humanity in everything we make; I love to find things and I hate to interesting things go to waste.

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Rubina Kazi

Rubina Kazi was born in Bombay, India and moved to the United States in 1996. She is a computer and software engineer by profession. Rubina has always been artistically inclined with a keen creative eye, and a feel for the arts. Her work with calligraphy and abstract art is influenced by her upbringing, international travels, love of music and nature. She considers herself an “accidental artist” and feels lucky to be able to follow her childhood passion for painting. She always gets tremendous satisfaction from the act of painting or watching something come to life on a canvas in front of her. She loves colors, gestures and textures coming together to express a deeper emotion. She loves Sufi music and the message of peace, love, tranquility and the eternal being—across all religions and cultures. Her paintings and calligraphy are a humble attempt to reflect the same. Most of her work is acrylics/oil on canvas as she finds this medium is able to create layers of meaning and depth to reflect upon. She is actively supported in pursuing her passion by her husband and two lovely kids. Although, she is well versed in building software applications—and has been doing that for many years—for her the computer will never replace the feeling of brush on canvas or pen on paper. Contact: www.rubinakazi.com, and rubinakaziartist@gmail.com

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Michael Lafferty

Michael Lafferty lives in his hometown, Oakland. He began taking photographs while touring the Western U.S. as a musician. Though he earned a bachelor of Music degree and a Masters in Social Work from San Francisco State University his formal training in visual arts has barely begun. The influences on his artistic sensibilities are more subliminal than overt. Music from a wide range of genres colors his photography by osmosis. He appreciates artistic expression that is unique and quirky, though his own work is “straight photography”. It recently appeared in the exhibit “The Gravity of Today: Visions of Tomorrow” at the San Francisco Main Library.

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Coral Lambert

Coral Lambert, currently living in the Aok, was born and raised in England and studied at Central School of Art, London, Canterbury College of Art, Kent, and received her M.F.A. in Sculpture from Manchester Metropolitan University in 1990.  Since then Coral has shown her work extensively in England and America including: The Barbican Center, London; Franconia Sculpture Park, MN; Convergence in Providence, Rhode Island; Grounds for Sculpture; and twice in Chicago’s International Navy Pier Walk.  Coral Lambert has lectured as a visiting artist at the Royal College of Art, London and RIT, New York, among many others. From 1995-1998 she held the position of International Artist/Research Fellow in cast metals at the University of Minnesota. In 2000 she was invited as the semester visiting artist at the University of North Carolina and has returned there several times since.  Coral is the Founder of the US/UK Contemporary Cast Iron Sculpture Residency Program that has taken place in England and America annually since 1997. A recent recipient of the Jerome Fellowship and Gottlieb Foundation Award, she also has artwork in several private collections. She and her husband spent a brief time here in Berkeley, CA after they were evacuated from the Gulf Coast during Hurricane Katrina, where they lost much of their work. Coral is currently Co-Chair of the 5th International Conference on Contemporary Cast Iron Art. Her artwork references asteroids, standing stones, and volcanoes; icons of transformation that careen between astronomy above and archaeology below.  Central to her work is the exploration of concepts related to growth and form, with a particular interest to those specifically found in natural phenomena that contain some kind of metaphysical presence.

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Silvia Ledezma

Silvia Ledezma is a Bay Area Artist born in San Francisco California. Silvia spent her formative years between Mexico and San Francisco. Ms. Ledezma has an M.A. on Design Visual Studies from U.C. Berkeley and a B.F.A. from the California College of the Arts in Interdisciplinary Fine Arts. As an Artist Silvia uses photography, printmaking or drawing. The Artist states “To convey an expression or emotion reflected in peoples or places in the world.” Ms. Ledezma has received numerous awards and recognitions in Mexico and the U.S. Her work has been exhibited in mayor Galleries and Museums throughout the U.S. Mexico, Cuba and Czechoslovakia. Her Art is part of various Collections in Mexico City and San Francisco Bay Area. Her extensive travel throughout Mexico has prompted to be influenced by Surrealist and Expressionist Art. In the early ’80 s Silvia participated in the Primer a Biennial de FotografĂ­a Latino Americana at Auditorio Nacional in Mexico City. She met Master Photographer Manuel Alvarez Bravo and became his Apprentice in Coyoacan Mexico. Currently she is a County Arts Commissioner for District 1. She is interested in jewelry making and graphic art and more importantly engages in the community wherever she goes in the world.

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Laurie Lippe

Laurie Lippe is a visual artist working in the East Bayhttp://www.laurielippe.net/

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Adrian Litman

Adrian Litman resides and works in the city of Santa Rosa, the heart of Sonoma Wine Country. Born in 1948, he started to learn about art at a very early age, playing with colors and art materials in his father's Art Design and Restoration studio. In 1963, he was accepted in the Fine Arts High School N. Tonitza in Bucharest, Romania where he studied various art techniques including drawing, painting, graphics, engraving, sculpture, fresco, mosaic and ceramics. After finishing the Fine Art High School, Adrian attended the University of Bucharest Art Institute, graduating in 1974 with a Master’s degree in Graphic Arts Design. Since 1980, after moving to California, Adrian has been creating an eclectic body of art, working on commissioned projects for Civic Public Art, Corporate and private clients, including custom paintings, murals, frescoes, mosaics, sculptures, stained glass panels, fountains and wall treatments, all of which facilitate the harmonious integration of art with architecture. Adrian's sculptures can be seen in Napa, Cloverdale, Geyserville, Los Altos and Hillsboro, OR. Some of his larger projects are in Stanford University School of Law, City of Milpitas, many businesses in the Bay Area and private collections in the US and abroad. The "Heart" paintings in this show are executed with plaster, oil and varnish on canvas. The coffee mugs are handmade ceramics. To view more of Adrian's work, please visit www.adriandesign.us. Adrian accepts artwork commissions from small to large projects in a variety of media.

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Jennifer Wallace Mack

Jennifer Wallace Mack held a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the San Francisco Art Institute. She worked in various media: painting, photography, mixed media, and jewelry. Her work was consistent in the quality and detail in each medium she applied. She exhibited at a number of solo and group shows, many of which were juried. Shown at Expressions Gallery is her magnificent jewelry. Jennifer also served on various Boards of Directors for long standing artists organizations such as the San Francisco Women Artists, where she was a past President and Vice Treasurer, and The San Francisco Gem and Mineral organization, as a Treasurer. "We are sorry to say that Jennifer Wallace Mack passed away in May, 2013. Her family knows we are pleased to continue to show her amazing work at our gallery.

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Noel Marsh

Noel Marsh lives in Berkeley, CA but was born in San Francisco and moved to New Zealand with his parents as a child. He returned to the U.S. as a young adult and has remained so ever since, despite being educated at UC Berkeley and Harvard and having a 25-year career in the U.S. State Department. Noel retired from the Foreign Service in 1984 after enjoying the excitement of living in different parts of the world serving in Asia, Latin America and Africa. He became a freelance international management consultant working in public health, child survival and population programs. This second career took him back to Africa and Asia as well as Egypt, Russia and Kazakhstan. When he quit consulting, he took up cartooning because he always liked to draw and joke. He was self-taught but took drawing and cartoon classes, including a seminar from Phil Frank, the well-known SF Chronicle cartoonist and creator of “Farley”. Phil became his friend and mentor and helped edit his first book: “Irreverent Ink for the Laughing Crowd”. Noel considers himself an internationalist. The cartoons emerging from his pen are definitely influenced by his exposure to diverse cultures and their humor. He believes laughing is always a good way to cope with grim realities of the developing world. His objective is to find humor in life's absurdities and common situations.

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Crystal Mckinney

Meet the Dare 2 Change family: Rev. Crystal Mckinney – mom; Jon C. Edmond – son; Starr A. Watkins - first daughter; and Anita M. Watkins - second daughter. This dynamic family of 4, which consists of a Mother, her son, and her 2 daughters, ages 15 and 16. They came up with the idea of teaching unsheltered residents a way of creating an income in order to supplement or even generate employment. They created this wonderful series titled “Moments In Time” Past, Present and Future, created from cardboard and paper products, glue, paints and finishes.

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Sarah Menefee

Sarah Menefee is a San Francisco poet, painter, and photographer. As long-time activist in the poor people's and homeless movements, she helped found such groups as the San Francisco Union of the Homeless, Homes Not Jails, and 'First they came for the homeless'. She is the author of several collections of poetry, including 'The Blood About the Heart' and 'Human Star'. She is a journalist with the People's Tribune [peoplestribune.org], a national monthly that covers the struggles for social and economic justice, where she edits its homeless coverage; and is a founding member of the League of Revolutionaries for a New America.

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Doug Minkler

Doug Minkler is a Berkeley printmaker, specializing in making posters. Past collaborations include work with ILWU, Rain Forest Action Network, SF Mime Troupe, ACLU, The Lawyers Guild, CISPES, United Auto Workers, Africa Information Network, Ecumenical Peace Union, ADAPT, Cop Watch, Street Sheet, and Veteran’s for Peace.

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David Mintim

David Mintim graduated from the California College of the Arts in 1990 with a BFA in Painting. In 1998, he began to work in the medium Glass Fusion. He works out of Studio One Art Center (part of Oakland Parks & Recreation) as a Glass Fusion Lab Monitor since 2000. Now he is influenced by documentary films of Jean-Michel Basquiat, and British graffiti artist Banksy. His work represents a spontaneity and transition of abstract expressionism spawned from oil painting onto glass fusion. Cutting and assembling a collage of changing colors and textures of compatible glass allows him to express forms at a different approach from painting. Glass has an unpredictability when high firing several times, which gives David new vision on how to proceed between each firing. David is also a member of the Firehouse Art Collective and respectfully shows his artwork through public events of the collective and at Firehouseartcollective.blogspot.com. The body of Davis’s work is a consistent twenty five year span of some personal experience and free spirited thought that reflects art for art’s sake.

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Joanie Mitchell

Joanie Mitchell born in Ohio, she has been sketching all her life. After traveling the world for some time, Joanie returned to her linear roots through the magic of digital art. Berkeley City College has given her a digital education and a community of artists with whom to share the journey. In the Pixel exhibition, Joanie’s images digitally combine and enhance her original travel sketches. Sister Giant, a gathering of women, is a digital collage of encounters from India, Latin America, the United States and Africa. www.joaniemitchell.com.

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Maj-Britt Mobrand

Maj-Britt Mobrand lives in Berkeley, CA, but was born and grew up in Stockholm, Sweden.  As a little girl, she saw her grandmother’s loom in the attic and was very intrigued by it and knew she wanted to master one of those.  She has taken weaving classes both in Sweden and the U.S., but is for the most part self-taught.  She has been teaching weaving here in Berkeley since 1968.  Some of the juried shows she has participated in are U.C. Berkeley and Live Oak Art Galleries in Berkeley (1969); Artist League of Vallejo Gallery (1975); Olive Hyde Art Gallery in Fremont (1988); and, Pro Arts Gallery in Oakland (2006 and 2008).  She has also participated in many Open Studios and has shown her work at various local venues and as a result has weavings in many private collections.  The artist states: “I enjoy using traditional weaves and patterns in a non-traditional manner and am striving to find a harmonious balance between the natural and the artificial or planned.  My inspiration is derived from music, nature, travels, my grandchildren, and from my students.  It’s wonderful to see the enthusiasm of my students as they develop their projects on their looms after I’ve given them the ‘know how’.”

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Rose Moore

Rose Moore was born in Nashville, TN and majored in Studio Arts at the University of Minnesota where she grew up.  After marrying fine art painter Jose Vidal of Barcelona Spain in 2005 she launched her line of hand painted natural shell jewelry. She currently makes her home in various locales, the Mission District of San Francisco being one.  An avid traveler and one time recording artist, Rose draws her inspiration for her painting from nature. She says:  "I find the intrinsic beauty of nature to be a key element in what allows me to create.  Light and texture influence my choice of colors whether painting flowers or abstracts.  Working with mother of pearl shell is especially captivating, as it possesses its own natural light.  The bend of curve of every shell in its pristine state is of itself a work of art."

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Narcisse Jewelry

Narcisse Jewelry, Italian finished handmade jewelry, are all handmade with Natural Gemstones from around the world, and are held to the highest level of quality and craftsmanship. These bold fashion forward pieces caught the eye of a handful of celebrities and clothing designers and found themselves worn on the runway by designers and models for 2014/2015 fashion week Paris, NY, and Milan. Since then, celebrity clientele have included Beyonce, Victoria Beckham, Jennifer Lawrence, and more.

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Malcolm Nicoll

Malcolm Nicoll was born at the foot of the Rockies in Colorado on September 26, 1959.  He earned a B.F.A. in Art History from University of Northern Colorado and a B.A. in Art Education from Colorado State University.  He lived in and traveled extensively through Europe and is now based in the San Francisco Bay Area. He has been exhibiting his large-scale paintings and fused mosaic glassworks in Europe and the Bay Area for over fifteen years. He is currently creating highly colorful and expressive glass bowls, plates and jewelry and looks forward to showing his new works in the coming year.  The artist states: “George Bernard Shaw once said, ‘without art, the crudeness of reality would make the world unbearable.’  To deal with this crudeness we can either engage creation or destruction; to walk the artist’s path is to engage creation.  Through painting and working with glass, I am supported by dreams and visions that steer me toward existence beyond the ordinary.  Whether I’m creating in two or three dimensions, I have a heartfelt, spiritual connection that takes the work beyond beauty, dreams and aesthetic visions, beyond color and line on a surface into deep unity.  From this place, humanity’s inherent potential becomes visible, reminding viewers of their own divinity and the promises of their creativity.”

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David Palmer

David Palmer is a Berkeley native who has lived here half his life. When he became disabled he needed a mental challenge to replace the ones that he couldn't do at his job anymore. David loved his job, he was a precision machinist. He had absolutely no experience in doing bead work, started off with the typical straight line stuff, and moved on to this shape. This was something that he figured out by himself, in order keep the challenge level high. Because David believes that if you challenge yourself, then life will not have to do it for you. It's taken about 2 years for his work to get to this point. Mr. Palmer’s work is dedicated to the woman who not only encouraged him to continue throughout his many failures, but was the inspiration he needed to stay focused and continue to press forward. Michelle was very proud of his work and of David when it started taking shape. If she were here to see just how much it's developed in the few months since her passing, she would be beaming that bright smile of hers.

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John Paulin

John Paulin is a Berkeley artist, originally from Massachusetts, who began making art after completing his Ph.D. in philosophy and Greek Tragedy at UC Berkeley. John is largely self-taught and admires the abstract art, folk art, and art from the ancient Mediterranean as well as the Neo- and Paleolithic eras. He works in real media, including acrylics, ink, and graphite and in digital media and prints in pigmented inks on rag paper. Recently, John has moved from pure abstraction to a conceptual art and bricolage that reincorporates his doctoral work in philosophy, mythology, epic and ethics.

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Heli Perrett

Heli Perrett is a sculptor and painter. She has lived and worked in some 40 countries. As of two years ago, she established her studio in Point Richmond. Her art can be found in several corporate and private collections as well as in museums. In the San Francisco Bay area, she has exhibited in galleries in San Francisco, Berkeley, and Richmond. The two paintings in the current show, one from 2016 and the other from 2017, are both acrylic on canvas, but represent quite different styles of painting.

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Marcia Poole

Marcia Poole spent her early years studying various philosophies and religions and became a Zen lay priest in her mid-twenties. She has continued her spiritual practices, with an emphasis on community action and artistic expression. Poole traveled extensively until the 1980s, when she stopped to relocate and received her BA at S F State College in 1985. She spent the next several years studying art & traveling. Poole joined Mother's Hen in 1994 and took over the graphics side of the organization, providing posters, web design, books, pamphlets and newspaper ads. Poole also helped established the Berkeley Poetry Festival. She wrote grants and proposals for funding, produced the programs and ads, and worked on the day to day coordination of the events. In 2010 she decided to resume her artistic career outside of the social and political realms and has produced numerous prints and has digitally printed and edited photos with Louis Cuneo. The latest show, Homelessness, which she co-curated with Rinna Flohr of Expressions Gallery, brings her artistic and social sensibilities together. She is one of the artists whose work is in the show.

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Winthrop Prince

Winthrop Prince has lived in Berkeley for about 30 years. He grew up in the Boston Area and is part of a family of artists. He has drawn since he was a child and always admired artists who had a certain humor to their approach. He graduated with a B.F.A. in Illustration from the Art Academy of San Francisco, and has made a living as an illustrator, a nationally syndicated newspaper cartoonist, and a fine artist showing his art at galleries and cafes. Certain artists he admires are: Kay Sage, David Park, Robert Crumb, Moebius, Phillip Guston and Saul Steinberg. He is presently involved in a graphic novel that aspires to add an element of fine art to the comic book form.

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Jeff Quiros

Jeff Quiros was born in San Francisco in 1948 and has never strayed far from the Bay Area for any length of time. His artistic talent was recognized at an early age when the nuns in his Catholic grammar school engaged him to produce bulletin board displays in his classrooms from cut construction paper. What started with occasional assignments from his 6th grade teacher in his own classroom very quickly grew to full time commissions for most of the bulleting boards throughout school. He maintained his regular academic study through attentive listening while he worked each room and was accepted at a top college prep high school passing an extremely competitive entrance exam. His high school art teacher, Rolf Penn, nurtured his talent and his work found its way beyond the classroom, throughout the school and beyond. His poster for the school’s annual fundraising event was displayed in transit buses throughout the city. After a short-lived diversion into pre-med at UC Davis, Jeff returned to his passion and earned a bachelor’s degree in Fine Art in 1966. His college years coincided with what is now generally considered the golden age for the UC Davis Art department, Accomplished and now famous artists in residence there included Wayne Thiebaud, Robert Arneson, Roy de Forest, Manual Neri, William Wiley and Roland Peterson. The rich environment shaped Jeff’s work across multiple disciplines including painting, sketching, sculpture, photography, printmaking and theatrical set design.

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Ernest and Lois Rich

Ernest and Lois Rich are metal artists who operate as an artist team, for 35 years they have designed and created sculptural and functional art for private and public spaces. Their move to California from North Carolina four years ago has been inspirational. The medium they prefer is mild steel. Initial shaping is done using traditional methods of fire, anvil, and hammer. The pieces are then joined for final shaping and finishing. The themes they enjoy most nature, music, and human form are a joy to watch evolve from the flat plane of hard steel. At this step, when the final touches either give movement and purpose to the medium or leave it cold and hard, define their success. Recent commissions include garden gates, entrance gates, footbridges, security railings, fences, furniture and sculpture for homes and gardens.

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Charlene Richter

Charlene Richter currently lives in San Francisco where she was born and raised. Her first adventure into the world of art was when she learned to knit at the age of 5. From there she taught herself how to crochet, sew, weave, spin and dye raw fiber, and then about 6 years ago she moved into the world of jewelry making. Currently she is designing jewelry and multi-pieced silk scarves. The unifying factor in all her work is the essence of color. The artist who has influenced her the most is Kaffee Fassett, who started out as a painter, but who is now working with textiles. She admires his unique sense of mixing different patterns and colors. Artist states, " I love to work with colors,... to watch what happens when you put them next to each other and to make them sing.

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Chris Roche

Chris Roche has been involved in fine photography for over 40 years. He has a BFA from The Rhode Island School of Design and an MFA from The San Francisco Art Institute. He works doing photography every day and always has a camera with him. People he’s spent time with in this arena include, Garry Winogrand, Larry Sultan, Henry Wessell Jr. , Harry Callahan, Jim Goldberg, Leon Borenstein among others. Each year he goes on several week-long trips where he spends 10 – 12 hours a day photographing. Even after 40 years his drive to expand his artist vision endures.

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Selma Rockett

Selma Rockett lives in Berkeley, CA, and was born and raised in Lewiston, ME. As a very young child, Selma learned to use “make believe, fantasy, whimsy and pretend” to enhance her days and this is what influences her art.  Many wonderful people she has met in life inspire her work. Hats have always had a role in her life. Selma is primarily self-taught, however, she did study briefly with Bertha Underwood in Oakland, CA.  Her mediums include fabric, straw, yarn, wool and “lovely trinkets, feathers, buttons and all things shiny.”  The hats are hand molded, using an art medium to set the design. The hats are not ‘named’ as most are one of a kind - therefore, ABSOLUTE WHIMSEY.

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JoAnna Ruckman

 

JoAnna Ruckman is an antidisciplinary artist, formally trained in photography and printmaking. Her practice is a layering of diverse media ranging from intimate formal gallery work (tools, white boxes), to public engagement through printing political posters (see posters), to a socially engaged oral history documentation project (see HairStories). She is currently a candidate for a dual degree MA/MFA at SFAI and earned her B.A. in Visual Arts and Cultural Anthropology from Brown University. JoAnna is an active member of SF Poster Syndicate, is currently working in the Print Public Residency at KALA, and is a resident artist at Phoenix in Alameda.

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Genevieve Saldanha

 

Genevieve Saldanha as born and raised in Berkeley. She comes from an artistic family and aspires to be an actress on Broadway. She is drawn to the razzle dazzle of the stage and incorporates that glamour and brilliance in her jewelry. Her favorite pieces integrate Swarovski crystals with other glass beads, Pave beads and semi-precious stones. She loves to customize her jewelry to fit the personality of an individual. Besides the Expressions Gallery, Genevieve also shows her jewelry at her local Parish community. Her talents include charcoal drawings, and handmade cards.

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Jos Sances

 

Jos Sances was born John Joseph Sances in Boston, attended Montserrat School of Visual Art in Beverly, Massachusetts. For over the past 40 years he has made his living as a Printmaker and Muralist in the San Francisco Bay Area. Jos is founder of Alliance Graphics, begun in 1989, a successful, union screenprint shop. www.josart.net/

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Sumiko Saulson

 

Sumiko Saulson states: This is my first time being shown at a gallery, so I am extremely excited about it. My previous showings have been in non-gallery spaces including cafes and cultural centers. My two-month long showing at CafĂ© 3016, ended on the 1st of January, 2014.  The tiny dresser and table lamp in the squalid hotel room with its yellow stained walls is the kind of thing I used to see on a regular basis during the period of time I lived in SRO hotel rooms in San Francisco when I first moved there between 1987 and 1989 and again, in the later months of 2005 before I left for the East Bay.  My painting,  “ Single Room Occupancy” depicts a depressed woman sitting on a filthy mattress in a single room occupancy (SRO) hotel with a single window and a single lamp on a tiny nightstand. Currently Sumiko is the author of three novels in the science fiction, horror and dark fantasy genres, “Solitude”, “Warmth”, and “The Moon Cried Blood”, and a short story anthology. She is also a published poet who once was profiled in a San Francisco Chronicle article about up-and-coming poets in the Beatnik tradition. The child of African American and Russian-Jewish American parents, she is a native Californian who has spent most of her adult life living in the San Francisco Bay area.

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Arlene Risi Streich

 

Arlene Risi Streich grew up and lives in Oakland, Ca. and cannot remember a time that she has not been interested in art. She received her B.A. ED and B. F. A. (Painting) from California College of Arts and Crafts (Now CCA) and has lived and spent much time in Mexico doing painting and photography. She has taught in the Oakland Public Schools, Diablo Valley College (Painting, drawing and fashion illustration) and CCAC (Children’s classes). She is presently exhibiting her glass jewelry, a medium started eight years ago, and her painting. Her jewelry work is influenced by her background in painting, which is incorporating a bold use of color and line. Her painting and jewelry work has been shown in numerous exhibits around the country and in private collections. Artist states: “Our role as artists is to continue to amaze, provoke, stimulate, delight and agitate the senses.

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Barry Shapiro

Barry Shapiro states: I use images now, almost exclusively, to tackle the social themes I’ve been addressing verbally, as a Philosophy teacher, Diversity trainer, and Political activist, for over 40 years. Having grown up as a Jew during WW II, I always knew that prejudice was harmful, more alarmingly, often lethal not only for individuals, but for whole peoples six million of my own, before I was 10. So understanding how prejudice and oppression operate, and how they can be reduced (if not actually eliminated) has been a lifelong quest for me. On the other hand, as an artist, I am easily seduced by beauty, curious and distracted by how things look, awed by spectacle, and addicted to the pleasures of illusion.

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Michael Topliff 

Michael Topliff currently lives in Berkeley, CA.  The artist grew up along the Southern Peninsula, San Mateo, Foster City and finally in Sunnyvale, CA. The artist thinks he was always creative and in his early twenties he knew he wanted to do something like drawing and/ or painting.  The artist has taken drawing classed at the community college level, but is mostly self-taught. The artist admires the Impressionist and Surrealist movements, and is inspired by Salvador Dali and Max Ernst.  The artist likes acrylic paint because it dries quickly and you can apply many layers in a short period of time.  The artist has shown his paintings numerous times in the Marin County Fair and the Napa County Fair.  The artist is also a member of the Oakland Art Association who has shows at a number of venues in the East Bay.

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Gary Turchin

 

Gary Turchin is the author/illustrator of the wondrous, If I Were You (Simon DeWitt 2011), and the award-winning Ditty-Ditty Doggerel; A Life From Bad To Verse (Simon DeWitt 2012). In 2013, he published a book of serious poetry, Falling Home, (Sugartown Publications). Gary is also a performer and visual artist. His drawings and digital images have been shown in galleries throughout the region and beyond, and have been reproduced on  t-shirts, greeting cards and in calendars. His drawings have been collected in The Book of Self & Other Drawings (Green Man Press 1995). Gary has written/produced and performed three one-man shows for adult audiences and one for kids that he toured schools and libraries for more 10 years.

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Liz Wiener

 

Liz Wiener is a digital photographer and printmaker active in the East Bay art scene. At 78 she lost her apartment of 17 years because of a rent hike she could not afford to pay. She has been unable to secure senior housing because of the long waitlists. Her image, "Unsheltered," reflects the turmoil and instability of people looking for permanent housing in the East Bay, who cannot afford adequate housing.

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James Wood

 

James Wood is a self-taught artist, musician, and photographer. After being involved in both radio and music, he has returned to photography as a creative outlet. He manipulates the camera and photo, producing very unique images as imaginative as the avant-garde music presented on James notorious Outer Limits radio show. He was inspired by legendary artist and friend Sun Ra, and other jazz and classical musicians, as well as his meeting with John Cage. James’ early photography was used on both Sting and Peter Gabriel’s first CD-ROMs. His photos of Sun Ra are published by Transparency Records. He has been a contributor to the Stranger in Seattle. While in Seattle, James formed the ensemble ... kagel... for improvising musicians using both conventional and homemade instruments and electronics

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Mike Zint

 

Mike Zint, an East Bay resident, is the founder and coordinator of First They Came For the Homeless. “I've always been interested in creating. While homeless, my medium was mostly hemp jewelry and crystals, and what I could sell quickly to feed myself. I learned art all through school. While on the streets, my inspiration was needed. I sell what I can to feed myself.

 

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